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that we are providing incentives, economic incentives for new industries, clean technology, could almost get the justification for funding -- for funding that through hamilton's argue. hamilton makes the argument that we need infrastructure and roads to support manufacturers. he makes the argument that we need the right tax incentives, and that we need a right of work force that is educated. jefferson has the view that the government needs to support manufacturing. now, this becomes the american economic system and influences henry, abraham lincoln, and is the governing philosophy of america's rise in industrialization. herbert hoover, when i got to the commerce building, and why would your name be in the commerce building, the president responsible for the depression, there's a lot of republic for hoover. he was not the best president, but a great commerce secretary. he was the secretary of commerce and under secretary of everything else, and he was working for calvin coolidge, and you know what hoover did? he believed in the american economic system, and he and calvin coolage, the apos
but this gentleman has caught the world's attention because he gave a tech talk, technology entertainment design, many are boring but his talk has been viewed 100,000 times. here is part of it. >> i was only four years old when i saw my motherlode the washing machine r the very first time in her life. even grandma was invited to see the machine. throughout her life, she had been heating water with fire hood and hand wash laundry for her seven children and sat down in front of the machine and she watched the entire washing program. to my grandmother, the washing machine was a miracle. >> but there are seven billion people on work and most have no access to such miracles. >> two billion have access and the remaining five billion, how do they wash? they wash like this: by hand. it is a time consuming labor which they have to do for hours every week. they want the washing machine. they don't want to spend such a large part of their life doing this hard work wit so relatively low productivity. but when i electric truer to environmentally concerned students they say everyone in the can world cannot ha
. so, before the mobile phone only to technologies had spread as widely as the mobile phone. no technology has spread as rapidly as the mobile phone. the only other recent one was the transistor radio and before that, it was fired to spread as wildly. so, what is the -- we know what it means in our lives and what smart phones been and all that but what does it mean for the majority of the world's population. it was built highways, communication highways and labor never connected before. in afghanistan we talk about story that you asked about entrepreneurs and was responsible for creating the afghan cell phone company. this is the biggest story in afghanistan and the last ten years. we don't hear about it. why? because the fact that more afghans today have access and know how to read or write, when a decade ago they would have had to walk 700 miles to make a phone call. but that's not a story. what is a story? it is a big story. i would imagine it is something that means a lot to them in terms of their key devotees. but what is even more exciting, you think about when we buil
on theyu would put you to sleep but he has caught the roads attention because he gave a talk to technology entertainment decide more than 100,000 times here is part of it. >> when i saw my mother and though the washing machine for the first time in her life. >> even grandma was invited to see the machine. she had hand washed laundry for seven children and she sat down in front of the ch she watched the entire program and was mesmerized to my grandmother>> b the washing machine was a are >> there 7 billion people and most have no access to the miracle. hav >> 2 billion have access but the remainnng 5 billion how do they wash? like this. by hand. it is a hard time consuming labor that they have to do for hours every week. they want the washing machine that what the large part of their life doing this hard part with low productivity. but environmentally concerned students say that everybody can have them. how to retell this woman she cannot? >> students don't want them to? >> they are concerned aboutngou how many of you had to wash your genes? no one. s one time there was one boy. but there w
of the century, united states is pushing forward with technology and the market economy and they have a lot of good public health things being done and the rest of the world that is dominateing, india and china, but in the 60's they missed. the market economies are good and they grow their economies and they are catching up. today when we land, 2010, these are the untries that borrow money to the richest when they have their problems. >> in my mind t this raises two questions, or two amazing results from this. there have been thousands of years of human history and everyone was stuck on the lower left for thousands of years, it has been 200 years that you have all of this activity and how come some countries are still stuck? >> it is easy to understand. the best message today is that most of the african countries are now in fast economic growth. they have corrected the wrong market ideas they had 20 years ago, and they have a much better education than, -- and tanzania is similar to thailand in 1972 and soon we will see african countries doing good. >> this is wonderful. our problems are so
the world's attentiongentleman because he gave a tech talk, technology entertainment design, many are boring but his talk has been viewed 100,000 times. here is part of it. >> i was only four years old when i saw my motherlode the washing machine for the very first time in her life. even grandma was invited to see the machine. throughout her life, she had been heating water with fire hood and hand wash laundry for her seven children and sat down in front of the machine and she watched the entire washing program. to my grandmother, the washing machine was a miracle. >> but there are seven billion people on work and most have no access to such miracles. >> two billion have access and the remaining five billion, how do they wash? they wash like this: by hand. it is a time consuming labor which they have to do for hours every week. they want the washing machine. they don't want to spend such a large part of their life doing this hard work with so relatively low productivity. but when i electric truer to environmentally concerned students they say everyone in the can world cannot have cars and wa
solved those problems with their no loss of suction and steering technology, but those solutions cost nearly $600. two years ago shark introduced their amazing lift-away upright which truly revolutionized the vacuum industry because it too offered no loss of suction and swivel steering technology. but it also featured a sealed system, and it converted into a lightweight and portable vacuum, all for one-third the price of a dyson. even after two years of home usage, the result is over 95% of shark owners still recommend it to a friend. go online yourself to see all the four- and five-star reviews the shark has earned. all this proudly made shark the most recommended vacuum in america. and now shark has redefined the vacuum industry again! introducing the all-new, revolutionary, high-performance rotator lift-away! it's the greatest vacuum breakthrough in the last 20 years. a powerful, no loss of suction upright with enhanced swivel steering for superior maneuverability in and around furniture and tight corners. a lift-away for super lightweight and portable cleaning that tackles the tou
disappointing data. well, technology shares under pressure, especially the large cap names. the selling could be due to uncertainty on a budget deal and folks just wanting to lock in gains, potentially, of course, before taxes on capital gains go up next year. maybe not such a surprise. check out the spider select technology fund, an etf, exposure to the likes of, yes, app 8, and soft -- apple, and software makers and stocks. xlk, the name, and it's dropping. apple, of course, look at what apple's doing, down today, about 1%, but it is up 27% this year. google moving higher. microsoft and ebay lower today, especially ebay down, well, nearly a buck today on the trade. all right, so about, oh, about 47 minutes left of trading on the day after christmas. the markets still trying to get back to the water mark. they are now down about six points after briefly getting above in positive territory. tech stocks the worst. case index showing home prices on the rise, a good thing. check in on how this moves the markets, if at all, nicole's on the new york stock exchange, and jeff flock at the cme. nicol
of people's eyes, which was about technology, quite critical comments about technology, which seemed quite a bit odd, given that he has only just started using twitter. >> he is not opposed to technology, as such. he is actually quite charming in his use of it -- for example, twitter. i think he is drawing attention to something that concerns a lot of people, not just catholics or christians, and that is that in the revolution, the information revolution that we are living through, the past 30 years or so, we are all of us experiencing the increasing pace of that revolution that is putting people in distress. we experience it has individuals with the phenomenon is burned -- phenomenon of burnout, which is virtually epidemic in the western world. of course, for society, it has a very serious repercussion, mainly that a society where everybody feels overloaded and cannot cope with how much they are being asked to do, it becomes a very uncaring society, a very egotistical society, and ultimately carries the seeds of its own destruction within itself. that was his message. >> what struck you a
year. the japan electronics and information technology industries association said that worldwide production of mobile phones will rise 12% next year to $245 billion. that's as an increasing number of people switch to smartphones from regular mobile phones. but production by japanese makers, that will grow only by 1% to $17 billion. their share in the global market is expected to decline to 7% from the current 8%. japanese makers have been struggling to make inroads to the global market where apple and south korea's samsung remains strong. >>> the japanese are making use of the digital technologies to tap into the skin care market. fuji 2 uses a smartphone to analyze the condition of a person's skin. users place a sheet called a color reference chart alongside their face and take photos with smartphones that have special software inside. it compares the skin with their chart. it rates the user's skin condition. they say the data are uploaded and stored to help users and cosmetics companies to choose suitable skin care products and treatments. meanwhile, sony has utilized its digit
new technology fosh trailing and surveying. but the country is taking steps to bring its goals into reach. earlier this month, manila hosted an international meeting for countries that use geothermal power. >> it's an exchange of experiences, knowledge and realistic knowledge transfer. >> reporter: the organizers also hosted the tour of geothermal power stations in the philippines. the delegation from kenya visited this facility. the visitors found that japanese technology is widely used in the philippines, a japanese firm constructed this plant. 33 years later it is still operating at full capacity. >> we are very impressed because of the standard the availability rate is over 95%, which means that it is available most of the time. we feel that this is an example we ought to emulate. >> a japanese government official also joined the tour. like the philippines, japan has a high level of volcanic activity. it is the third largest geothermal energy reserves in the world. but geothermal makes up less than 0.3% of its energy mix. the accident at the fukushima nuclear plant in 2011
for the suggestion. we have about 25 minutes left. we'll come back and talk with jason pontin of the "mit technology review." the subject is about solving big problems in america. we'll take your calls in a moment. [video clip] >> the british admirals and generals were reporting to the crown that the colonists were sending ships everywhere to try to get ammunition and muskets and cannons. this was after the british had sent more troops to boston after the boston tea party and it's clear the colonists were pulling together the ammunition and cannons. the king basically prohibited british ships from taking ammunition and everything to the colonies unless it was officially sanctioned. they were very alert to this. as soon as the collins found out about the order in new hampshire and rhode island, they took the ammunition so everybody knew it was coming in the winter of 77 for-1775 -- in the winter of 1774-1775. >> "washington journal" continues. host: we are focusing on the "mit technology review." we are talking about big problems in the world. we will get to this coverage in just a second. this is ja
resolutions because it involved ballistic missile technology. china opposes a legally binding resolution. the permanent member of the security council argues such a move could prompt north korea to carry out another nuclear test. japan is working with the united states and south korea to impose additional sanctions, but tokyo's ambassador says the three countries are too distant from china's position to permit dialog. >>> the u.n. general assembly has adopted a resolution about north korea's human rights violations. the document expresses serious concern about what it describes as systemic and or systematic and widespread human rights violations. they include torture and public executions. the text also urges the north korean government to resolve the abduction of japanese citizens and other foreign nationals. a north korean diplomat has dismissed the document as political fabrication. >>> it's certainly not up to the minute, but state-run media has been much faster in reporting the results of south korea's presidential election than they've been in the past. the brief reports thursday,
eye on 2016. okay, when we come back, from energy to education, to technology. our panel's pick for the good news story of the year. hmm, it says here that cheerios helps lower cholesterol as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] olaf's small busins earns 2% cash back on every purchase, ery day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great businesses deserve great rewards! awesome!!! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day afr day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] e pill eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur >> well, just when you thought there wasn't that much to cheer
are in companies investing in. >> when i was a corporate analyst in india tracking markets, technology was considered the engine of growth for the country and one of the bright spots for the market. is technology still one of the areas you are tell clients to invest in in india, or what are the sectors you're looking at? >> i think there's two sectors whether you look at india, china, or asia. there's two sectors we like. it's technology, as you said. i think that's one that -- it's a bright gem. you know, it went from, in india, from a bpo outsourcing business and has grown to an innovation business where brands are being developed and real technological gains are being had. the other sector we like is health care. the demand for health care in these markets is just continuing to grow steadily. obviously people are having longer lives, having more disposable income for health care and treatment. and so those are two sectors we really like. >> okay. and curious, as an emerging market investor, how closely are you watching the fiscal cliff negotiations here in the u.s., the debt crisis
a little win. nicoderm cq, the patch with time release smart control technology that acts fast and helps control cravings all day long. ♪ quit one day at a time with nicoderm cq. >>> hello from new york, i'm chris can hayes heave with richard wolffe and the great heather mcgee, carl smith, the university of north carolina chapel hill, contributor to a blog. and socket sony, the migrant workers advocacy group. the latest gdp provisions looks like the economy may finally genuinely be in a real recovery. it increased by 3.1%. of course, we've been here before many times over the past four years and each time it appears that the economy is going to achieve a philosophy, it gets pulled back to earth. there are two issues. cyclical, how and when we will once achieve full employment and strong growth and structural issues, what aspects do the fundamentals of our country work and not work. barack obama has insisted it won't be enough to cover the downturn and the economy needs fundamental reform and invention. >> i know that we'll have to overcome our doubts and our divisions and we're going t
that galvanized indians. >> our kids were going to be whoever they were going to be. >> but technology can help couples pick the sex of their child. the consequences and the concerns even here in the bay area. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, southern california: a womad a girl died after a car plowed into a bus benchn riverside. thi >>> developing introduce out of southern california. a woman and a girl died after a car plowed into a bus bench in riverside. this afternoon's crash also injured two others. it's unclear what caused the car to mount the sidewalk. >>> highway 1 near big sur is back open tonight. caltrans closed that road sunday after a rockslide. this week an emergency contractor cleared it and fixed the road and stabilized the hillside. the highway reopened to two-way traffic about an hour ago. >>> you don't have to pay to ride on muni tonight. the transit agency is offering free rides to celebrate its 100th birthday. buses, the underground, cable cars are all free. you can still hop on no charge until 5:00 tomorrow morning. >>> big fans. '60s. '70s and '80s the dmv has something new for you. cbs
this was not impersonal market forces, this was not technology, this was not globalization. what was happening was american politics and american economics were working against the middle class. people did this. we decided this. if you look at other countries like germany, their middle class is in better shape. they've done better trading against the world, their companies are making money. so a lot of the things we heard that were not impossible, not possible in america are actually happening in germany, and their wages have gone up five times faster that than ours. there's something wrong inside the american economic and political system, and that's what this book is about. >> host: hedrick smith is the author. thank you for being on booktv. >> from the fourth annual boston book festival, a panel featuring author edward glaeser. it's about an hour, 15. >> good afternoon and thank you very much for coming to this auditorium today. let me introduce myself, i'm bob oakes from morning edition on wbur, boston's npr news station. [applause] thank you. thank you. i'm sure some of you are saying, wo
. at the same time, the nature of military conflict is changing. because of the new technologies like cyber and proliferation of missiles, we are seeing potential adversaries, state and non state actors alike acquire more advanced, hybrid and high- end capabilities designed to frustrate the conventional advantages of our armed forces. this means the military services must remain vigilant and strong and appeared to . to operate in a way that differs significantly from the past. we will continue to face terrorism and deadly attacks by ied's, but we must also be ready for more capable adversaries to attack our forces and homeland in cyberspace. to attack and launch precision strikes against forward bases, to attempt to cripple our power grid, our financial systems, our government systems. to attempt to deny us freedom of action isometric attacks. as i said, the goals of our new defense strategy is to help shape the force of the 21st century. try to adapt our forces and operating concept said that we are better prepared for an unpredictable and dangerous future. we have been determined to avoid
into the early 21st century, the confidence has given way to doubt. technologically newer forms of travel especially airplanes and rocket-propelled capsules provide the sense of extreme danger that had faded during the relatively safer nineteentnineteent h century. equally, it's now clear that imperialism had smoothed the way from early circumnavigate is under political and social conditions that would be unwise and unjust to perpetuate let alone re-create. above all there is a growing sense of the planet as beginning to fight back or shrug us off. that that was environment the cost of planetary dominatiodominatio n that had begun to haunt us. we live with all three legacies of around the world travel, every emerging fear that the planet could simply shrugged this off, continuing confidence if we might be able to generate technology and political alliances to dominate the planet but doubt that it is always wise to dominate it in that way. is especially apparent that the characteristic confidence of the long 19th century was the shortest of planetary experiences. yet it has been the most d
market equation whether they want to go dig deeper, wider, with over the situation is. and the technology of copper mining is getting better so they can - 312 in bisbee. it gets bad but they knew had to do it in a way that saves them money so it is a constant cycle of boom and bust boom and it is even more pronounced if you go to the mining towns meaning the company towns. and in arizona we have company towns. it's rare to find a company in the united states anymore where they have everything, schools, the bar, hotels, the supermarket, the barbershop so every single person in the town is paid by the line. that is true in the biggest one in the united states is in arizona. it's a company town. and it's a very depressing place to go. maybe about 700,000 tons of copper a year so its huge. i don't know if you noticed the design, but they did a great job. any of your questions? what's that? >> [inaudible] >> yeah, exactly. that's right. so, any other questions? >> i find it really fascinating what you said about the fact they just don't know how to control the fact that they are polluting. do
war and it's particularly true of the navy is it six kind of on a technological point in american history things had been changing for some time. the power comes in and the railroads already expanding across the continent but the application of the large-scale warfare in the civil war is one of the first cases where we see that. now the land war probably arguably at least is the most immediate impact was the shoulder muskett which dramatically extended their range the soldiers could fight and at sea there are a number of similarly important technological changes. obviously there is steam that had been around for a generation or more with the application, the universal both on the blockade and those attempting to run the blockade rifled guns just as muskets in the field armies and the artillery extended their range and accuracy thereby hiding elevating the impact of the war ships over the guns ashore going into the civil war. the general motion was turned guns ashore are going to defeat them afloat every time mainly because they don't sink. but with the new rifle ordinance and expl
be watching and maybe putting money up against? here to tell us is technology reporter natalie morris. welcome back. you had a little baby since the last time, ava. congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> nice christmas, i'm sure. let's start with what you see as a possibility in the phone space next year. >> okay. so i'm seeing a lot of rumors about something called branded phones. so facebook, amazon, now google, mozilla, having whisperings about their own phone which may be a little confusing for consumers but these are phones that are highly branded with these services and that you will be able to get to the services anywhere you are. you can facebook anything -- >> instead of motorola, i will have a private label amazon phone that's going to help me get to amazon and its services quickly, facebook and its quickly. but will they run on droid or microsoft's platform? >> that's the question. there are rumors that mozilla will do their own operating system but a lot of these will probably use some version of android. >> let's talk about microsoft which is always in the news. the surface,
it was a test of a ballistic missile technology and was in violation of u.n. security council resolutions. >>> china has opened what it calls the world's longest high speed rail line linking the capital of beijing with guan jo in the south. here's more. >> reporter: the first high-speed train from beijing is about to leave the railway station. many passengers are carrying coats because the temperature in beijing is about 20 degrees centigrade lower than here. the new line stretches nearly 2300 kilometers, including a section already in service. the trip between the two cities will take about eight hours instead of the current 20 1/2 hours. china says it developed the high-speed train line on its own. based on the technology used by japan's train. the launch of the new service expands china's high-speed railway to more than 9300 kilometers. officials plan to extend it to 16,000 kilometers by 2020. the chinese government temporarily suspended construction of high-speed train lines after 40 people died in a two-train collision last year. but it has resumed construction with the aim of helpin
years, is the idea that technological advancement might replace some workers. we don't have big heavy guys throwing a box on to a ship like you see in the 1940's movie. they're containerized ships using cranes and they're concerned that further technological advances will replace some people that right now, according to the waterfront commission, about a third of the new york workers make north of $210,000 a year without is special bonuses that come on later. 34 made north of $350,000 a year last year and they're worried about being replaced by machinery and -- for the most expensive port in the world. >> eric: thank you to brett. thank you, sir. >> thank you. >>> is this port strike happen, should unions face a backlash? we contacted the international longshoreman's association again, still no word. we tried it yesterday. we have 64,000 longshoreman to may hold up 50 or 60% of the nation's import and export trade. >> it's worse. when you throw in another looming fiscal calamity. you're damaging the economy at the time it's already suffering damage. >> is what the unions do? think abo
by technology. the maritime alliance wants the royalties capped. earlier this month a port strike in southern california, cost an estimated $1 billion a day. netflix is blaming problems at its web service provider, amazon for a server outage that took down its streaming video service on christmas eve and into christmas day. netflix says it worked through the night with engineers at amazon to get the service back up and running. netflix shares rebounded today, rising almost 2%, while amazon shares fell nearly 4%. >> susie: amazon was just one of many stocks in the red today. as we mentioned earlier, stocks were dragged lower by the retail sector after a report showed consumers did not go all out this holiday shopping season. that sent shares of some of the nation's largest retailers lower. macy's fell 1%. upscale retailers coach and saks were hardest hit. walmart and best buy were also modestly lower. volume improved a bit from monday but was still light with many traders still on vacation. no surprise, consumer related stocks were some of the weakest performers in today trading. consumer disc
says it positions its agents where they are most effective, and that increased manpower and technology have dramatically reduced illegal border crossings. >> yes, there is traffic out on those ranch lands. communities continue to be impacted to a certain extent. but you can't discount the fact that the gains that have been made over the course of the last few years. >> reporter: but the ranchers see it differently. >> the border is not secure. the border is worse than it's ever been. >> reporter: they're most afraid when the sun goes down, and their land comes alive with mexican smugglers headed north. mark potter, nbc news, arizona. >> and there's late word tonight of a huge settlement involving toyota and lawsuits related to claims of sudden acceleration in some of its cars. the settlement is worth up to $1.4 billion. some of the money will go to owners who said they sold their cars at reduced prices because of bad publicity over those claims of sudden acceleration. a lawyer for the plaintiffs called it the largest settlement involving auto defects in u.s. history. >>> and coming up
with the great improvements in technology that unleashed the powers of capitalism, and capitalism manage to produce immense wealth. something unpleasant but -- and at the same time produce poverty that had never been known before. the debt is to capitalism what hell is to christianity. unpleasant, but absolutely necessary. in a sense, capitalism is about ecological economics, even though capitalists don't want to hear this. it is about recycling. we had heard of the term by the 1970's, especially about the green movement in europe. capitalism has always been recycling. the process of described is a process whereby the entrepreneur is now forced to be an entrepreneur. the ex-peasants, they did not choose to be entrepreneurs. they had to be. they used debt. bringing it to the present, energizing the production process, producing the wealth from which he hopes that he will be able to repay the debt. the moneylenders, later the bankers. cover for the fact that he had paid wages for capital goods. hoping there is something left for him, for profit. debt is all about intertemporal recycling. b
. heather: helping paralyzed people walk again. the high-tech medical technology helping real-life miracles happen. we will show you how it works greg: president vladimir putin accused of playing politics with the lives of orphans after saying that he is going to sign a controversial ban on adoption by any american of russian children. the state department just minutes ago saying that the idea of this, some of the parents would find her adoptions roseanne, would be unfair to the parents and kids involved. it has already been a controversial subject. the 7-year-old was placed in a plane and his mother saying the boy was violent and her family feared for their safety. russia's foreign minister at the time called the last off after a string of foreign adoption failures. some of the children killed by adoptive parents. joining me now is attorney david wohl and janet jackson. so what is your take on this, david? >> you know, 1999, 45,000 russian kids had been adopted by american families. the vast majority of them engraved loving homes. there have been a few cases of abuse and neglect. no questi
moved to an area we thought, part two, very big issue. data, technology, and privacy. broca number of debates which include third-party information issues this is a debate. national security of all other issues which is between richardson and couponing. and then we have the einstein. we thought it will be interesting to have a debate about what the new technology is moving forward with his between gen dempsey and paul rosenzweig. and then the communications system law-enforcement act. what's next, susan land out. we are starting with the framework of a week-old legal frameworks for projecting force. we will have to of those debates . to they were going to do cyber warrant attention policies and start off with the tension policies. dry to start off with craig jacobs. and both individuals are quite well known to be, but not to you and the audience. served in several high-profile positions in the government including at the white house to the other partner justice, the department of labor. most recently great served as the third ranking official of the part of labor. in this position
that development of technology while it is short in distance it did not negate, it made it more important because it opened up a whole new geography and the world trade system cultural and economics flow from the geography because what is culture? it is the accumulated experience of a specific people on may specifically and skate over hundreds of thousands of years that leads to tradition and habits that can be identifiable. one of the places i've always considered to have the most deeply denzel identifiable culture shock is remaining. you know, nobody can admit there's a specific romanian culture that's been formed by the consul let between innovators coming from central europe and those coming from the plateau which has fostered a suspicious negotiation and character they can see right of into the politics in bucharest to this day and i can go to every country, not every but many countries and talk about but. >> talk for a moment about germany. one of the images germany has natural boundaries to the north and south with the alps and further burden the east and the west is flat plains, so german
cutting edge technologies. >> reporter: the machine's developers have big dreams. they want to be provide handmade products to consumers around the world. >>> for the people who run japan's amusement arcade life is fast from fun and games. some operators are adapting by targeting the older player. >> more than half the people who visit this arcade on weekdays are age 60 or over. this couple is in their 70s. >> it's no fun staying alone at home. that's why i come here. >> translator: i haven't joined any senior citizen groups. it's more comfortable and less stressful here. >> reporter: we're in a shopping mall in a suburb of inazawa city. there is not a lot to do here as far as shops and entertainment goes. the mall is about the only game in town. the number of elderly customers is up by one-fifth from 14 years ago when the mall opened. so as the young and family clientele shrunk, the owner shifted his target to the elderly. he makes an effort to help the customers stay fit so they'll enjoy the games more. a daily exercise routine started this summer. it eases stiff joints and backs. the c
, they are rooted in scientific discovery and technological innovation. there has to be a greater appreciation for the role of science and technology in society. we have to get young women engaged early. we found that if young women are engaged in experiments to work, if they are part of the team, it makes a big difference. we try to create an intergene rational mentoring system. when young women come through the ranks through the promotion and tenure process, we have to ensure fairness of the system. it is a complex problem. that is why it is hard for people to talk about it. >> why is it important that there are more women? >> it is important that there be more science. we are about to face what i call the quiet crisis. you have a number of scientists in this country who came of age when i did. they are beginning to retire. those retirements are going to accelerate over the next few years. the second hidden variable is that we depend strongly on immigrants. we have always been a nation of immigrants. i do not think people appreciate how much of our science and engineering work force is made
lyric's advanced technology, call or visit trylyric.com for a risk--free 30--day trial offer. you'll also get a free informational dvd and brochure. why wait? hear today what a little lyric cacan do for you. lyric from phonak. life is on. >>> you know, i'm going to call it a flat market. yeah, i know the dow industrials are up, but that's pretty flat on the index. look at oil, that's interesting, yeah, looking at $91 a barrel. say goodbye to the long decline of gas prices, they're going to start going up again. if you watch a lot of television news and we do, hopefully you do just that, you may feel bombarded with the bad news, fiscal cliff, debt, crime, john stossel does not see that, are you going to break out into it's a wonderful world. it is a wonderful world. and you're right, it's terrible with the parasite lawyers and. stuart: parasite lawyers, excellent. >> in spite of that, people work around the politicians and life, i consider it my duty this time of year to step back and say, is life really getting better? it is and it has. louis the 14th have 498 people cooking for h
, then distribution, then production. in conjunction with the great improvements in technology that unleashed the powers of capitalism, and capitalism manage to produce immense wealth, and at the same time produce poverty that had never been known before. the debt is to capitalism what hell is to christianity. unpleasant, but absolutely necessary for it to work. in a sense, capitalism is about ecological economics, even though capitalists don't want to hear this. it is about recycling. we had heard of the term by the 1970's, especially about the green movement in europe. capitalism has always been recycling. the process of described is a process whereby the entrepreneur is now forced to be an entrepreneur. the ex-peasants, they did not choose to be entrepreneurs. they had to be. they used debt. bringing it to the present, energizing the production process, producing the wealth from which he hopes that he will be able to repay the debt. the moneylenders, later the bankers. cover for the fact that he had paid wages for capital goods. hoping there is something left for him, for profit. debt is a
analysis particularly important technology. people confuse this group of stocks constantly. tech is actually a whole group of sectors, semiconductor -- semiconductors, hardware makers, cell phone, tech, telecommunications tech, infrastructure stocks, assemblers, each has a separate growth rate. here i look to look at the earnings per growth rate shares of companies i follow versus individual slices of the sectors. the sector growth rate doesn't work even though people keep trying to use it. cloud stocks are highly valued meaning the price to earnings to growth rates are extreme. that means there's no room for error or hair as we call it, meaning something is wrong, some chink that could upset the growth rate. in 2007 my favorite sales.com reported a magnificent quarter but the growth was lighter than expected. it got pancaked, why? it underperformed its shoergz of the technology sector even as the growth rate would have been outstanding for a personal computer-related stock, disk drive, semiconductor, or cell phone companies. these days knowing what the sector is isn't enough. yo
a fraction at the moment. 13,139 after a meandering much of the day. the nasdaq hardest hit today. technology has been very volatile recently. still down a fraction right now. 13 points, fraction percentage-wise and the s&p is down 3.33 at 1423. five days left until the fiscal cliff deadline, and though the market has been very resilient to this point, what happens if we go over the cliff and if lawmakers cannot get it together come january 1st? will it be a big meltdown for wall street? that's what everybody wants to know. >> certainly hope know. in today's "closing bell" exchange, former chief economist of the vice president joe biden, oliver perch from gary goldberg and matt cheslock and rick santelli, thank you very much. jarred, you wrote an article called "cliff dive, what the heck happens next?" what does happen next? >> well, that's actually all up to john boehner, as i see it, because if we were to decide to bring the president's most recent small car compromise to the house i actually believe it would pass. the problem for him it would probably pass with mostly democrat vote, but i
, the technology revolution. and one reason i think that it's really pretty clear that those are key drivers is this is a global phenomenon. and i do sometimes think the american discourse about it tends to be very american. so i'm always quite entertained when i read about, you know, a paper that says rising income inequality in the united states is due to this one particular law passed in the 980s. -- 1980s. okay, then how does that account for rising income inequality in canada or, indeed, even in france, in germany, in the united kingdom? i mean, it's happening all over the world, it's also happening in emerging markets. but i think it is important to face that scary because if you see it just as a political phenomenon, you know, you're going to lose sight of what i think is the biggest challenge which is that these, actually, quite benign economic forces, right? i love the technology revolution, i'm a google addict. they're also drivers of social and political consequences which are not quite so benign. the way i like to look at it, and this is a quote from peter orszag, is, you know, h
're extracting record amounts of oil and gas from shale through fracking and other technologies. pushing prices for natural gas which is used in part to generate electricity down. that helps utilities and heavy industry compete. creating more jobs for americans, all of these things put together are sending my runner, the u.s. economy, dashing ever faster down that road toward an economic renaissance. one that offers real prosperity. real jobs for years to come. but running fast on this road requires something else -- an investment in infrastructure. and that's a subject of discussion i really had with harvard professor ken rogoff, "wall street journal" editorial righter. and i started off by asking how can you convince lawmakers that infrastructure money is well spent and how can you insure that the money is in fact well spent? >> i think you have to have firm regulatory oversight. it's not something you can just spend the money and walk away from. but there are the electricity grid, water, aging bridges, there's so many things, hardening our cyberinfrastructure. against terrorist attacks. many
taking a look at the big technology stores of 2012. stories of 2012. >> catherine: san francisco's muni railway is celebrating 100 years. as part of the centennial - service on all buses, light- rail lines and cable cars will be free untilfive a-m tomorrow. if you don't have any plans for new year's. >> they are offering extended until 3:00 a.m.. there will also be offering additional trains in and out of san francisco to accommodate new year's eve crowds. also, muni will be free. caltran will be offering free service with the extended hours and there will be for extra trains out of san francisco. there will be 4 extra trains --, also, with free between 11:00 a.m.-2:00 a.m., and extended service on the broadway shuttle. this shuttle will run from 7:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. on the year's eve. there will also be offering extended service on in several routes. if you are planning on driving keep in mind that between 11:00 p.m.-1:00 p.m. along the embarcadero there will be long traffic delays because of the fireworks near the ferry building. charles clifford, kron 4. >> tonight at 6:00 p.m. we are
own the best and i am short the rest. sector analysis is particularly important in technology. because people confuse this gigantic group of stocks, which comprises more than 15% of the s&p 500, constantly. tech is actually the agglomeration of a whole group of sectors, semiconductors, disc drives, software, cloud, internet, personal computers, large scale enterprise hardware makers, tech, tech communications, infrastructure stock, assemblers. each has a separate growth rate. and here i like to look at the earnings per share growth rates of the companies i follow versus the individual slices of the sectors. because the sector growth rate doesn't work even though people keep trying to use it. cloud stocks, for example-r highly valued. meaning the price teernings and growth rates are extreme. that means there's no room for error, or hair as we call it, meaning something is wrong, some chink that could upset the growth rate. in 2011 one of my favorite cloud plays, salesforce.com, report aid magnificent quarter but its guidance for its billings was later than i was hoping. the stock immedi
invent things we didn't buy, faster than any technology. number nine, the u.s. stock market despite all the worries about the fiscal cliff, the stock market had a great year. >> number eight. facebook's i pshlpo. investor diagnosis not. trading glitches and questions about the company's ability to make money on mobile users unload the stock which has yet to climb back to the ipo price. >> number seven, mother meyer. the new ceo of yahoo who announced she would take a two-week maternity leave. 37 years old and it looks like a mother's touch is what yao ya hoo needed. >> an intense drought that scorched the corn and soy crop sending prices sky high. who can forget super storm sandy. neighborhoods along the northeast swept away millions without power and damages as high as $50 billion brings in lots of questions about u.s. infrastructure and whether we should spend money to fix it. >> number five, china. for sure by 2030. >> china. >> china getting more than a few mentions during the presidential campaign probably because it's clear they are both a competitor and a partner. >> number four,
based on technologies used by japan's bullet train. the launch of the new service expands china's high-speed railway network to more than 9,300 kilometers. officials plan to extend the network to 16,000 kilometers by 2020. the chinese government temporarily suspended construction of high-speed train lines after 40 people died in a two-train collision last year. but it has resumed construction with the aim of helping correct economic disparities between england and the coastal areas, and shoring up the economy. strong concerns remain in china about the safety of high-speed railways. >> translator: it's good to be fast, as well as safe. but safety should be given priority. >> reporter: railway ministry officials stress that they will reinforce safety measures. these including limiting maximum speed to 300 miles per hour for the time being, 50 kilometers per hour slower than what the trains are capable of. shun ishibe, nhk world. >>> a suicide bomber has struck a u.s. military base in afghanistan, killing three people. patchari raksawong joins us from our bureau in bangkok with the detai
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